Tips to extend the life of your airbrush tan.

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Nothing lasts forever. Unfortunately that’s true about spray tans. But there are some tricks for keeping that tan as long as you can!

Some of the most important things to help with you tan are done at home before you step foot in the tanning salon. That begins with exfoliating!  Spray tans only work on the top, outermost layer of your skin. This makes them much safer than tanning beds or laying out in the sun, but it also means that the tan won’t last quite as long. We are always losing skin. The top layer of skin dies and falls off or gets rubbed away by clothes, showers, etc. To make sure you’re not applying your tanning solution to a layer of dead skin that is just about the fall off, you should exfoliate the day before your tanning session so that the fresh skin underneath is the skin that gets tanned. There are tons of exfoliating scrubs, sponges, and gloves on the market that can help you with this task. You can even make your own natural sugar scrub if you’re handy like that! There are tons of great recipes out there. Whatever you choose to use, make sure you do it the day before your appointment.

Also be sure you shave (or wax) the day before your appointment. When you remove hair, you often remove a bit of skin as well. If you wait until after your airbrush tan, you’ll be removing a layer of the newly tanned skin with your hair, and that will reduce the time you get to spend with that glow. Plus, if you have hair on your body, the tanning solution will get on the hair and it can block the solution from getting to your skin and working it’s magic.

On the day of your appointment, don’t put on any creams, sprays, perfumes, or lotions. A layer of lotion on your skin can block the tanning solution from absorbing into your skin. Choose your outfit carefully before you leave the house, too.  Skinny jeans are great, but don’t wear them to your airbrush tanning appointment. The tanning solution dries pretty quickly, but it’s still a good idea to avoid tight-fitting clothes that will rub against your skin and potentially rub your solution off before it has a chance to fully penetrate and give you the best possible tan.

After you’ve gotten your treatment, avoid water for a few hours if you can. It takes about 6-8 hours for the solution to completely settle in and do it’s job. Until then, avoid showers, baths, saunas, and heavy work-outs since sweating opens pores and washes away the solution just as much as a shower can.

Once your tan has settled in (after that initial 6-8 hours) then be sure you keep your skin moist to lock that skin in. You know how your skin gets flakey when it’s dry? Those flakes are dead skin shedding off. Your hydrated skin will stay healthier longer. Once your skin is nice and tan, we want to keep it! Keeping your skin moisturized will ensure that you keep that tan as long as possible. We recommend moisturizing at least twice a day. If you can find a moisturizer that has SPF sun protection built-in, even better! It will help protect your skin from those damaging UV Rays we mentioned earlier!

When your skin is nice and tan, it’s best to limit your time in chlorinated pools. Chlorine dries your skin out and sometimes can even have a bleaching effect. So it’s best to avoid chlorine altogether if possible, but if not – be sure to shower it off as soon as you can when you get out of the pool and keep that moisturizer flowing!

Following these tips can ensure that your tan lasts as long as possible.

Science of Tanning

1221There are several ways you can get a natural tan. The most obvious is from the sun. Light from the sun reaches the earth in three different forms: visible light, infrared light, and ultraviolet light. The last type, ultraviolet light, is classified into three separate categories:
* UVA or black light, which causes tanning.
* UVB, which typically causes damage in the form of sunburn.
* UVC, which doesn’t affect us because it’s filtered out by the atmosphere before it can get to our skin.
The problems we associate with sun exposure, such as premature aging, skin cancer, sun spots, etc. are primarily caused by harmful UVB rays. Research suggests UVA might have a hand in these things as well. Most of the sun’s UV radiation at sea level is UVA rays.
UVA can be reflected, as well. Snow actually reflects roughly 90% of UV light, which is why you can get severe sun burns while skiing or snow boarding. Sand reflects up to 20% of UVB too, so at the beach, you’re getting more UV exposure than you would be getting if you were sitting in your backyard. Water also reflects UV light, although it doesn’t prevent it from penetrating the surface of the water. You can still get burned while swimming. Some surfaces can absorb these rays rather than reflect them. Certain types of glass do this, and our own melanin in our skin absorbs UV light to some degree.

Ultraviolet light in the sun stimulates the production of melanin. This pigment protects cells from damage by absorbing as much UV radiation as it can. Imagine you put a sponge on top of a piece of paper and slowly dropped beads of water onto it. The sponge would soak the water up before it can ruin the paper. That’s sort of what your melanin does to UV rays. It can become saturated, though. Eventually if you keep dropping water on it, the paper will be ruined.

It’s this protective melanin in your skin which gets darker and creates what we call a tan. Caucasians typically have the least amount of melanin in their skin on a day-to-day basis, but in many other races, there is a continuous melanin production, which causes the skin to remain pigmented and also offers more protection against UV rays.

It’s important to note that all UV rays are potentially dangerous. They can cause deep damage to your cells, which results in painful sunburn at best and fatal skin cancer at worst. It’s important to protect yourself from skin damage by wearing sunscreen when you’re outside. Avoiding direct sunlight is the best way to protect yourself. This really ruins your chance at a tan, though.

There is one more way that you can get naturally darker skin, however. That’s through DHA.  DHA is an organic compound naturally found in your own body that creates a chemical reaction within the amino acids in the outermost layer of your skin when applied directly to the exterior of your body. This reaction does not involve the underlying skin pigmentation, nor does it require exposure to ultraviolet light to initiate the change in color.  It is similar to the maillard reaction which occurs in food. It’s a natural, temporary color that looks just like a tan that occurs from melanin. The active ingredient in airbrush tanning is DHA. The color produced in an airbrush tan typically lasts 7-10 days, but it is much safer than roasting yourself in the sun or using a tanning bed.

The Truth About Tanning Beds

I have to admit that I have been seduced by the idea of the tanning bed. All you have to do is lie down in a bright room for a few minutes and walk out with gorgeous tan skin? Sign me up! If 28 million Americans are tanning in beds and booths every year, there must be no harm in it, right? Wrong… like any other seemingly easy fix, it comes at a high price – and not just from your bank account!

Dr. Felix Müller invented the first tanning unit with UV lamps for the public consumer in 1956. Fifty-five years later, tanning beds and stand-up booths are made up of high pressure bulbs that hold a higher ratio of UVA light than that of the atmosphere. The UVA and UVB lamps used in tanning beds are 2-3 times stronger than then sun because of the pressure levels and proximity to your body. Call me crazy, but I’d think twice before entering any device that claims to be stronger than the sun itself!

Low pressure beds and booths are also an option, and are recommended for beginners because of their low pressure release of only UVB rays. I find this recommendation completely ridiculous considering that UVB rays are the most harmful to your skin! Because of their deep penetration, UVB rays are the leading cause of skin cancer. It has been proven that indoor tanning increases your risk of developing melanoma by 74%. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, “melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, killing approximately 8,650 Americans in 2009.”

Even the kids on the Jersey shore have come to realize the life-threatening effects of indoor tanning! On an episode of Extra, Dr. Deborah Sarnoff, the Vice President of the Skin Cancer Foundation, did a life changing intervention with the cast of Jersey Shore to enlighten them about the dangers of the “T” in their daily GTL. Pauly D even admitted that he was going to put his tanning bed up on craigslist! Whatever happened to the age of the parasol and the over-sized hat?

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What is Airbrush Tanning?

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What is Airbrush Tanning?

Airbrush tans are made from a DHA solution. DHA is a simple carbohydrate, not a harmful chemical! Additional bronzing solution is added, which adds a layer of color to skin. DHA reacts with the top layer of skin cells to form a tan. The solution is applied by a professional, while you stand with arms and legs spread. The tanning professional walks around and evenly sprays the bronzing solution on your skin. We do all the work, and in less than 20 minutes you’ll have a beautiful tan! Airbrush tans naturally fade away instead of peeling off in blotches and don’t leave orange streaks!

Is it Safe?

Airbrush tanning is a safer alternative to indoor tanning beds or to outdoor tanning, because you are not exposed to harmful UV rays. There is no risk of skin cancer associated with airbrush tanning. The solution used is completely organic! It’s dermatologist recommended and FDA approved, with a very low allergy risk.

What do I need to do before I go airbrush tanning?

24 hours before your appointment, you should exfoliate all areas which will be treated. An exfoliating body wash or scrub does wonders! You want to get rid of any dead skin so that the spray doesn’t stick to it and then flake off. Making sure you’ve exfoliated will ensure that you get the longest-lasting, most even tan possible!

What do I need to do after my airbrush tan?
Showers or baths should be avoided for the first four hours after airbrush tanning. Ideally, no soaps or shower gels should be used for the first eight hours after applications. You don’t want to wash off the solution!

How Long Will My Tan Last?

An airbrush tan can last up to a 10 days, particularly when hot baths and chlorine are avoided.

If you have any other questions, feel free to call! We welcome your questions and consultations are always free. (303)-722-4040